Home
About Us
History
Reenactments
Gallery
FAQ
Links
Members/Contact Us
Saturday March 16, 2024
Conshohocken St. Patrick Day Parade
Join us for a short march/Parade in honor of St Patrick Day.
Click for full detail

Saturday April 06, 2024
School Of the Soldier / Civillan Meeting (Heckler Plains)
Civilians and troops unite ! Attend this Important event for all ! Wipe the rust off or learn how to fall in company by line.
Click for full detail

Tuesday April 16, 2024
ZOOM Monthly Business metting
Check your inbox ~ The 71st is meeting via ZOOM to discuss upcoming events
Click for full detail

Friday April 26, 2024
Sunday April 28, 2024
Camp Geiger Re-enactment
First event of the year ! See the 71st burn powder and shine !
Click for full detail

Friday May 17, 2024
Sunday May 19, 2024
Peter Wentz Sanitary Fair & Civil War Weekend
Celebrate the 160th anniversary of the Great Central Sanitary Fair of Philadelphia, an event organized by the US Sanitary Commission to raise funds for soldiers’ aid during the Civil War!
Click for full detail

Click Here for a Complete Schedule

Spottsylvania

On the following day the march south was resumed and continued to Spottsylvania Court House. Upon taking position, the regiment was thrown forward as skirmishers. The rebel artillery and sharp-shooters made the position an uncomfortable one. An advance was made by Gibbon's Division, but without success. During the 9th and the 10th, it was on the skirmish line and almost constantly engaged in one of the enemy's attacks, Captain William M. Smith, who commanded the regiment, was severely wounded, and the command devolved on Captain Mitchell Smith.

On the evening of the 11th, Hancock's Corps was moved into position and prepared for an assault. At daylight it quietly moved, in well formed lines, under cover of a dense fog. The enemy's skirmishers had barely time to discharge their pieces before the Union column was upon them, and soon had possession of their works. The fighting was now severe, coming hand to hand; but the enemy was forced to yield, and large captures of men and material were made. In the charge Captain Smith and Lieutenant Clark were instantly killed, and the command of the regiment devolved upon Captain Peter W. Grear. For several days the regiment was on the skirmish line, and was kept busily employed, the enemy being vigilant for an advantage.

 

Source:

Bates, Samuel P. History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-65, Harrisburg, 1868-1871.